FUTURETHON FOR GLOBAL REFUGEES

Building innovative solutions for the world’s most vulnerable population: Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

SATURDAY OCT 6 + 7, 2018 @ TCC Ballroom & Hoffman Hall

Please Meet The Winner Of Our Grand Prize!

Our Grand Prize winners created a solution that transcends language barriers by enabling nonverbal emotional communication in IDP & refugee camps. This team of Trojans will be traveling to a refugee camp by the end of the year and hope to have a beta version of the platform ready to test.

Created By: Andrew Hulin, Aidan Maddox, Arya Bhatia, Antoine Hong, Abigal Africa, Isabella James

Please Meet Our Winners!

Amal, which translates to “hope” in Arabic, is an app that directly addresses the major issue of psychological distress faced by a majority of internally displaced persons and refugees. The purpose of the app is to alleviate the suffering and unlock the potential of displaced people by providing basic coping tools, access to resources, and anonymous group therapy. With features such as a mood tracker, journal, chat, map of resources, and an emergency line, the app addresses a great variety of IDP and refugees’ wellness needs. It also enhances data-driven care, with the ability to provide personalized e-healthcare forms from in-app health tracking, community tailored resources from location-based data acquisition, as well as further data on IDP mental health that can all significantly improve the effectiveness of NGOs and local healthcare services. This app has the potential to directly address the mental health taboo and provide hope for IDPs and refugees everywhere.

Created By: Yash Kamath, Kristen Mascarenhas, Srividya Dasarajum, Kurt Weatherford, Cyrus Khandalavala, Maggie Trungale

Amal, which translates to “hope” in Arabic, is an app that directly addresses the major issue of psychological distress faced by a majority of internally displaced persons and refugees. The purpose of the app is to alleviate the suffering and unlock the potential of displaced people by providing basic coping tools, access to resources, and anonymous group therapy. With features such as a mood tracker, journal, chat, map of resources, and an emergency line, the app addresses a great variety of IDP and refugees’ wellness needs. It also enhances data-driven care, with the ability to provide personalized e-healthcare forms from in-app health tracking, community tailored resources from location-based data acquisition, as well as further data on IDP mental health that can all significantly improve the effectiveness of NGOs and local healthcare services. This app has the potential to directly address the mental health taboo and provide hope for IDPs and refugees everywhere.

Created By: Hanna Fahsholtz, Sarah Wagner, Iris Kim, Garrett Nance, Lalise Beyen, Olivia Landau

What was the event?

Introducing Hacking IDPs, a 48-hour Futurethon designed to kickstart sustainable and long-lasting solutions to the global IDP problem. This event will encourage hundreds of students and partners to develop innovative solutions for humans who struggle for basic essentials.

Challenges

Voice of the Customer

How to rapidly ensure real-time, interactive two-way communication between IDP’s and national assistance programs and other players. How can information be better disseminated, feedback collected and needs identified from IDP populations.  Focus areas include official ID documentation, telecom/information infrastructure (incl. WiFi), tracking mechanisms.

Training and Local Employment

How to incorporate IDPs into global citizenship via vocational training and entrepreneurship for access to income to facilitate their return home. How and what types of jobs might IDP’s be well suited for?

Open Challenge Area

Hack any innovative solution evolving from a range of IDP issues such as hygiene, mobility, medical (including mental, pediatric, etc.), food delivery, safety and more.

Prizes

  1. Cash Prizes for three challenge areas: $2000 Grand Prize.  $500 each for the best innovative solution from the other two challenge areas.
  2. Fellowship within the Global Shapers Community, a network of young people driving dialogue, action and change.
  3. Assistance from the International Business Accelerator to build, market and sell the solution worldwide.
  4. Application assistance for upcoming grants for IDP solutions from US AID’s Global Development Lab, with awards ranging from $300K to $5MM.
  5. Support from USC Blackstone Launchpad
  6. Support from USC Gould School of Law’s Initiative on Immigrants and Global Migration
  7. Potential travel package for winning team(s) to visit IDP areas to help implement their innovative solution.

Relevant Example

There was a previous problem/challenge around hazmat suits that was solved by a wedding dress designer. The problem was that the current design of hazmat suits used in the Ebola-affected regions in Western Africa had several issues. For one, they are quite unwieldy, requiring separate 31 steps to put on, and 20 minutes and two people to remove. The fabric does not breathe and the face mask fogs up within minutes especially when health workers are working in 95TKF (TKC) conditions. The prevailing design also has 28 known points of potential contamination.

Drawing from her mastery of clothing closures, she sketched out a new design —moving the zipper to the back like a wet suit. This simplifies the removal process and allows the wearer to emerge from the suit like a cocoon. She also introduced larger face mask and a small battery-powered fan that blows air into the hood.

Working with a group of students, engineers, and public health specialists at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland during a weekend hackathon, the wedding gown designer gave the protective suit used by health workers a complete fashion upgrade.

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Mentors & Judges

Schedule

Saturday

9:00am | Arrival & Registration

9:30am – 11:15am | Presentations by Experts

9:30am – 9:45am | Intro & Overview –  Michael McClune – International Business Accelerator

9:45am – 9:55am | Opening Remarks From Alexis Bonell – US AID Global Development Lab

9:55am – 10:15am | Challenge Area #1 – Voice of the Customer – Callie Chamberlain – Refugee Relief Project

10:15am – 10:35am | Challenge Area #2 – Vocation & Training – Anna Merzi – AlgoPay

10:35am – 10:55am | Challenge Area #3 – Chris Lynch – International Business Acceletor

10:55am – 11:15am | Refugee Presenter – USC Cultural Relations Team

11:15am – 1:00pm | Teams Form & Hacking Begins

1:00pm – 2:00pm | Lunch Break

2:00pm – 6:00pm | Hacking Continues

Sunday

9:00am – 11:30pm | Hacking Continues & Workshops

11:30am – 12:30am | Teams Prepare Presentations

12:30pm – 1:30pm | Lunch Break

1:30pm – 3:30pm | Interview-Based Judging

3:30pm – 4:30pm | Final Presentations

5:00pm | Winners announced